, ,

Lose Your Sh*t Aboard Fat Albert – The Blue Angels’ C-130 Bird


040924-N-1539M-003 Houston, Texas (Sept. 24, 2004) Ð ÒFat Albert,Ó the Blue Angels' C-130 Hercules transport aircraft, banks-in in preparation for final over Houston, Texas. Fat Albert, home based at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Fla., has been flying relief missions into Pensacola following the devastation of Hurricane Ivan. On this mission, Fat Albert ferried pilots and maintenance personnel from Pensacola based Training Air Wing Six (VT-6), to their evacuated aircraft in Houston, Texas. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Saul McSween (RELEASED)

Houston, Texas (Sept. 24, 2004) Fat Albert, the Blue Angels’ C-130 Hercules transport aircraft, banks-in in preparation for final over Houston, Texas. Fat Albert, home based at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Fla., has been flying relief missions into Pensacola following the devastation of Hurricane Ivan. On this mission, Fat Albert ferried pilots and maintenance personnel from Pensacola based Training Air Wing Six (VT-6), to their evacuated aircraft in Houston, Texas. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 2nd Class Saul McSween (RELEASED)

 

Hey, hey, hey. The Blue Angels’ “Fat Albert,” the demonstration group’s support transport, puts on a solo show.

The Blue Angels flight demonstration team, made up of Navy and Marine pilots, have been performing since 1946. Here’s a “bet you didn’t know” fact about the Blue Angels – in addition to the F/A-18 Hornets flown for the precise maneuvers, there’s a C-130T Hercules that also performs.

Nicknamed “Fat Albert,” the C-130’s primary assignment is transporting spare parts, equipment and support personnel between performances. Flown by an all-Marine flight crew of three officers and five enlisted personnel, Fat Albert puts on a solo demonstration including low-level runs and breath-taking banking moves.

When it first started putting on demonstrations in 1975, the C-130 was used for Jet Assisted Take Offs. However, that was eliminated in 2009 because of a dwindling supply of rockets.

You can check out the cockpit video of Fat Albert in action at a recent air show and here’s a link to what it looked like from the ground.

 

Written by Wendell Barnhouse

Wendell Barnhouse is a veteran journalist with over 40 years of experience as a writer and an editor. For the last 30 years, he wrote about college sports but he has had an interest and curiosity about aviation since he was in grade school.